Reilly Gallery, Smith Center for the Arts

Thursday
12.1.16
6 PM

Artist Talk by Clement Valla

Clement Valla is an artist and programmer interested in processes that produce unfamiliar artifacts and skew reality. Valla works within systems, applying a ‘programmed brain’ that pushes problem-solving logic to irrational ends. His recent work examines copies, repetition and reproduction markets, including those related to PC-G’s own Reilly Gallery space and operations. This work explores the tension between individual creativity and the influence of systems and networks on the individual.

Valla received a BA from Columbia University in 2001, where he studied architecture. After working for architects in the USA, France, and China, Valla began using computers and digital technologies in his own work. He studied the intersection between art and computer programming at the Rhode Island School of Design’s Digital+Media MFA program.

He has collaborated with a number of artists, architects, designers, scientists and archaeologists, developing novel uses for digital technologies. His work has been shown and published internationally. He is currently a full time faculty member in the Foundations Department at RISD.


This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition "Clement Valla: Parallel Lines on a Freeform Surface" in PC-G's Reilly Gallery October 27 - December 10, 2016.

It is generously supported by the Art & Art History Department at Providence College.

Clement Valla is an artist and programmer living in Brooklyn and working Providence. He has had recent solo exhibitions at XPO Gallery in Paris and Transfer Gallery in Brooklyn and was included in the “Paddles On!” auction at Phillips, organized by Lindsay Howard. His work has also been included in exhibitions at the Museum of the Moving Image, Bitforms Gallery, Mulherin + Pollard Projects and 319 Scholes, all in New York City; Thommassen Galleri in Gothenburg, The Indianapolis Museum of Art, DAAP Galleries at University of Cincinnati and the Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum in Milwaukee. His work has been cited in The Guardian, Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine, El Pais, Huffington Post, Rhizome, Domus, Wired, The Brooklyn Rail, Liberation and on BBC television.

Clement Valla, "Blue Blox," 2016. Digital rendering. Courtesy the artist.